Friday, September 28, 2012

Maternal - Infant PDF Ebook




Healthy Pregnancy
Basic Care Plan: Prenatal Home Visit
Adolescent Pregnancy
Multiple Gestation
Hyperemesis Gravidarum
Threatened Abortion
Infection
Substance Abuse
Gestational Diabetes
Heart Disease
Pregnancy Induced Hypertension (PIH)
Placenta Previa
Preterm Labor
Preterm Rupture of Membranes
At-Risk Fetus
Labor and Birth
Basic Care Plan: Labor and Vaginal Birth
Basic Care Plan: Cesarean Birth
Induction & Augmentation
Regional Analgesia
Failure to Progress
Fetal Distress
Abruptio Placentae
Prolapsed Cord
Postterm Birth
Precipitous Labor and Birth
HEL.LP/DIC
Fetal Demise
Healthy Puerperium
Basic Care Plan: Vaginal Birth
Basic Care Plan: Cesarean Birth
Basic Care Plan: Postpartum Home Visit
Breast-Feeding
Postpartum Hemorrhage
Episiotomy and Lacerations
Puerperal Infection
Venous Thrombosis
Hematomas
Adolescent Mother
Postpartum Depression
Parents of the At-Risk Newborn
Healthy Newborn
Basic Care Plan: Term Newborn
Basic Care Plan: Newborn Home Visit
Circumcision
Preterm Infant
Small for Gestational Age (SGA, IUGR)
Large for Gestational Age (LGA, IDM)
Postterm Infant
Birth Injury

--> Hyperbilirubinemia
Neonatal Sepsis
HIV
Infant of Substance Abusing Mother

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Chinese Herbal Medicine Modern Application Ebook PDF




Part I Formulas According to TCM Zang Fu Syndrome
Differentiation
Chapter 1
Lung Syndromes and Formulas .............................................................................3
Chapter 2
Lung and Heart or Spleen Syndromes and Formulas .........................................53
Chapter 3
Spleen and Stomach Syndromes and Formulas...................................................59
Chapter 4
Spleen and Stomach with Heart, Liver, or Gallbladder Syndromes .................153
Chapter 5
Liver Syndromes and Formulas (Appendix: Gallbladder Syndromes) .............165
Chapter 6
Liver and Lung, Kidney Syndromes and Formulas...........................................239
Chapter 7
Heart Syndromes and Formulas.........................................................................251
Chapter 8
Heart and Kidney Syndromes and Formulas.....................................................279
Chapter 9
Kidney Syndromes and Formulas (Urinary Bladder)........................................283
Chapter 10
Kidney and Lung, Spleen Syndromes and Formulas ........................................313
Part II Formulas According to Allopathic Medical Systems
Chapter 11
Blood-Related Disorders ....................................................................................319
Chapter 12
Cancer Disorders ................................................................................................327
Chapter 13
Cardiovascular Disorders ...................................................................................359
Chapter 14
Dermatological Disorders...................................................................................375
Chapter 15
Endocrine Disorders ...........................................................................................387
Chapter 16
Ear, Eye, Nose, and Throat Disorders ...............................................................401
Chapter 17
Gastrointestinal Disorders ..................................................................................427
Chapter 18
Genitourinary Disorders .....................................................................................453
Chapter 19
Gynecological Disorders ....................................................................................465
Chapter 20
Immune System Disorders .................................................................................489
Chapter 21
Infectious Disorders............................................................................................497
Chapter 22
Miscellaneous Disorders ....................................................................................527
Chapter 23
Musculoskeletal Disorders .................................................................................533
Chapter 24
Neurological Disorders.......................................................................................541
Chapter 25
Pediatric Disorders .............................................................................................557
--> 

Chapter 26
Psychological Disorders .....................................................................................569
Chapter 27
Respiratory Disorders.........................................................................................575
Part III Single Herbs Classification
Toxic Herbs ...................................................................................................................................597
The Eighteen Incompatibiles .........................................................................................................599
The Nineteen Antagonisms............................................................................................................600
Table of Abbreviations ...................................................................................................................600
Chapter 28
Release Exterior Herbs.......................................................................................601
Chapter 29
Clear Heat Herbs ................................................................................................605
Chapter 30
Downward Draining Herbs ................................................................................615
Chapter 31
Drain Damp Herbs .............................................................................................619
Chapter 32
Dispel Wind–Damp Herbs .................................................................................623
Chapter 33
Transform Phlegm and Stop Cough Herbs........................................................627
Chapter 34
Aromatic Herbs That Transform Damp.............................................................633
Chapter 35
Relieve Food Stagnation Herbs..........................................................................635
Chapter 36
Regulate Qi Herbs ..............................................................................................637
Chapter 37
Regulate Blood Herbs ........................................................................................641
Chapter 38
Warm Interior and Expel Cold Herbs ................................................................651
Chapter 39
Tonic Herbs ........................................................................................................655
Chapter 40
Stabilize and Binding Herbs ..............................................................................671
Chapter 41
Calming the Spirit Herbs ..................................................................................677
Chapter 42
Aromatic Herbs That Open Orifices ..................................................................681
Chapter 43
Extinguish Wind and Stop Tremor Herbs..........................................................683
Chapter 44
Expel Parasite Herbs ..........................................................................................685
Chapter 45
Anesthetic Pain Relieving Herbs .......................................................................687
Chapter 46
Anti-Tumor Herbs ..............................................................................................689
Chapter 47
External Application Herbs ................................................................................693
Appendices
Appendix 1
Standard Syndrome Differentiation of Traditional Chinese Medicine..............699
Appendix 2
Glossary of Traditional Chinese Medical Terminology ....................................711
Appendix 3
Classical Text Listing .........................................................................................719
Appendix 4
Cross-Reference Pinyin–English Herbs .............................................................723
Appendix 5
Cross-Reference English–Pinyin Herbs .............................................................735
Appendix 6
Cross-Reference Pinyin–Botanical Latin Herbs ................................................747
Appendix 7
Cross-Reference Botanical Latin–Pinyin Herbs ................................................759
Appendix 8
Cross-Reference English–Botanical Latin Herbs ..............................................771
Appendix 9
Cross-Reference Botanical Latin–English Herbs ..............................................783
Appendix 10
Cross-Reference Pinyin–English Herbal Formulas ...........................................795
Appendix 11
Cross-Reference English–Pinyin Herbal Formulas ...........................................811

How to download ?
Please click on image or here

Thursday, September 13, 2012

First Aid for The Family Medicine Ebook PDF

With First Aid for the Family Medicine Boards, we hope to provide residents
and clinicians with the most useful and up-to-date preparation
guide for the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) certification
and recertification exams. This new addition to the First Aid series
represents an outstanding effort by a talented group of authors and includes
the following:
■ A practical exam preparation guide with resident-tested test-taking
and study strategies
■ Concise summaries of thousands of board-testable topics
■ Hundreds of high-yield tables, diagrams, and illustrations
■ Key facts in the margins highlighting “must know” information for
the boards
-->

■ Mnemonics throughout, making learning memorable and fun
■ Timely updates and corrections through the First Aid Team’s blog at
www.firstaidteam.com.
Click picture above or click to download PDF

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Basic Clinical Massage Therapy PDF Ebook

--> Basic Clinical Massage Therapy: Integrating Anatomy and Treatment is primarily a textbook for advanced massage therapy students who have already acquired the basic skills of Swedish massage and are now pursuing additional training in clinical massage therapy. In this book, I define â€oeclinical massage therapy― as the use of manual manipulation of the soft tissues to relieve specific complaints of pain and dysfunction. As its title implies, our book integrates detailed anatomical information with basic clinical massage therapy techniques. By embedding illustrations of internal structures into photographs of live models, we are able to show exactly what muscle is being worked on, where it is, where it is attached, how it can be accessed manually, what kinds of problems it can cause, and one or more basic techniques for effectively treating it. The student can clearly see the involved structures in relation to surrounding structures, surface landmarks, and the therapist's hands. Therefore, this book offers a truly innovative visual and tactile understanding of anatomical spatial relationships integrated with the learning of treatment techniques, which has not been possible with traditional approaches. Our approach is possible only through teamwork. Although I have had chief responsibility for the text and Dave Pounds for the illustrations, we are truly co-authors, in that this project has been planned and executed by both of us working closely together from its very inception. Vicki Overman, an outstanding photographer, has worked with us in the first edition and shared our enthusiasm from the beginning. For the second edition, our photography is by Black Horse Studio in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. In addition to its use as a textbook, Basic Clinical Massage Therapy: Integrating Anatomy and Treatment can also serve in the following roles: A palpatory and muscle anatomy reference for practitioners. The anatomy of muscles and bones is complex, and an accurate knowledge of it is essential to effective treatment. The practitioner must have reliable reference sources to consult. In the past, practitioners have used atlases of anatomy designed chiefly for surgeons. This book is tailored specifically to the needs of the clinical massage therapist. By presenting the anatomy of muscles and bones in the context of the living human body, it bridges the gap between internal muscular and external surface anatomy and allows students and practitioners to see through the surface to the internal structures. A client education tool. One of the biggest difficulties facing a therapist in dealing with clients is explaining where a problem may lie, what structures may be involved, and what type of work is proposed. Currently, practitioners must turn to traditional anatomy references, or to whole or partial skeletons or other educational aids to make such explanations. The therapist can use this book to present necessary information to clients in a way that is easily comprehensible. New to This Edition In addition to correcting a number of errata, we have received feedback from some school owners and instructors, and have made the following additions and changes: We have added a palpation entry for each muscle. In addition to the references to the draping illustrations originally provided, we have added draping to illustrations of therapy. A custom DVD created by Real Bodywork (commissioned by the publisher) now accompanies the book, containing real-time video clips of a number of massage sequences presented in the book. Organization and Structure This book is divided into two parts. Part I, Foundations of Clinical Massage Therapy, pre-sents essential information about the basic principles on which clinical massage therapy is based. The first chapter explains the place of clinical massage therapy in the health field and reviews the essentials about muscle structure and function, body mechanics, basic techniques, and draping. The second chapter is a guide to examination: interviewing, observation, photography, and palpation. It also presents examples of forms to use and covers communication with physicians and other health professionals. Part II, Approaching Treatment, constitutes the â€oemeat― of the book. We have organized the chapters in this part into body regions that have functional, topographical, and clinical coherence. These regions are: head, face, and neck shoulder, chest, and upper back arm and hand vertebral column low back and abdomen pelvis thigh leg, ankle, and foot Each Part II chapter has the same internal structure. This rigorous internal consistency is deliberate: Learning is based on repetition, and a repetitive organization allows the reader to more easily process and internalize information. Each chapter, therefore, has the following components: Overview of the Region. Here, we review the muscular and skeletal components of the region under discussion, and offer observations on conditions that typically cause pain and dysfunction in that region. Extensive anatomy plates, presented in a horizontal (â€oelandscape―) format, depict in detail the internal anatomy. Labels point out each pertinent structure and are keyed to the text discussion. Muscle Sections. Each muscle of that region is then discussed. These sections are distinguished by their use of various icons that highlight key pieces of information. Pronunciation. As communication between massage therapists and other members of the health care community continues to increase, it is important to know how to pronounce each muscle name correctly. We use a phonetic pronunciation key that is easy to decipher. Etymology. A brief derivation of each muscle name is given. Etymologies are extremely helpful in learning and remembering anatomical structures. Overview. Here, we give a succinct but thorough overview of the structure and function of the muscle. We also review potential causes of pain and dysfunction that may affect the muscle. Comments. Where appropriate, interesting or esoteric comments about the muscle are included. For instance, we point out that biceps brachii resides on the humerus but has no attachments to it, and that in addition to being a flexor it is the most powerful supinator of the forearm.
download plese click here