Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Chinese Nutrition Therapy PDF


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The basic principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine
(TCM) are rooted in the Taoist philosophy of
yin and yang. These two polar opposites organize
and explain the ongoing process of natural change
and transformation in the universe.
According to ancient lore, yang marks the sunny
side and yin the shady side of a hill. In the theory of
yin and yang, all things and phenomena of the
cosmos contain these two complementary
aspects. The traditional Taoist symbol for completeness
and harmony is the merging monad of
yin and yang.
The standard of TCM, the Huang Di Nei Jing, “The
Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Medicine,” dates as far
back as 500–300 BC. This 18-volume classic work
has two parts, Ling Shu and Su We. The Su Wen
explains the theoretical foundations of TCM in the
form of a dialogue between the legendary Yellow
Emperor Huan Di and his personal physician Shi
Po.
The Ling Shu, the practical part of the Nei Jing,
reports on therapies and their uses in TCM: acupuncture,
moxibustion, nutritional therapy, and
the use of medicinal herbs.
TCM is rooted in the Taoist worldview employed
by physicians and philosophers for centuries as a
guide for viewing and interpreting natural phenomena.
Tao means harmony–destination–way, the “all-inone,”
the origin of the world. The teachings of Taoism
are based on the work Tao te King (Tao te
Ching), “The Book of theWay and of Virtue,” by the
famous Chinese scholar Lao Tse (600 BC).
Guided by the Taoist perspective, “natural scientists”
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took the findings of these observations of
nature and applied them to humans. They
regarded the human being as a natural being, a
part of nature, subject to and dependent on
nature’s processes.
The main principle of Tao is represented by the
two polarities yin and yang, which, according to
Taoist belief, mirror all phenomena in the universe.

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Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Clinical Drug Therapy: Rationales for Nursing Practice PDF


Introduction to Drug Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1 Introduction to Pharmacology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
A Message to Students 2
Overview 2
Sources of Drugs 3
Drug Classifications and Prototypes 3
Drug Names 3
Drug Marketing 3
Pharmacoeconomics 4
Prescription and Nonprescription Drugs 4
Drug Approval Processes 4
Sources of Drug Information 7
Strategies for Studying Pharmacology 7
2 Basic Concepts and Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Overview 9
Cellular Physiology 9
Drug Transport Through Cell Membranes 10
Pharmacokinetics 10
Pharmacodynamics 15
Variables That Affect Drug Actions 17
Tolerance and Cross-Tolerance 20
Adverse Effects of Drugs 20
3 Administering Medications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Overview 29
General Principles of Accurate Drug Administration 29
Legal Responsibilities 30
Medication Errors 30
Medication Systems 31
Medication Orders 31
Drug Preparations and Dosage Forms 32
Calculating Drug Dosages 34
Routes of Administration 35
4 Nursing Process in Drug Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Overview 47
Nursing Process in Drug Therapy 48
Integrating Nursing Process, Critical Paths and Drug Therapy 51
General Principles of Drug Therapy 59
xvii
xviii CONTENTS
SECTION 2
Drugs Affecting the Central Nervous System . . . . . . . . . . . 71
SECTION 3
Drugs Affecting the Autonomic Nervous System . . . . . . 260
SECTION 4
Drugs Affecting the Endocrine System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
SECTION 5
Nutrients, Fluids, and Electrolytes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433
SECTION 6
Drugs Used to Treat Infections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493
SECTION 7
Drugs Affecting Hematopoiesis and
the Immune System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 627
SECTION 8
Drugs Affecting the Respiratory System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 693
SECTION 9
Drugs Affecting the Cardiovascular System . . . . . . . . . . . 738
SECTION 10
Drugs Affecting the Digestive System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 863
SECTION 11
Drugs Used in Special Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 912 

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Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Holistic Nursing Ebook PDF


Holistic nursing is a medical specialty that takes the entire being of the patient into consideration, rather than just diagnosing specific physical symptoms. Holistic nurses often recommend complementary medical treatments to assist patients in attaining better health. The nurse becomes a partner with patients by forging interpersonal and lasting relationships. Nurses who are trained in holistic healthcare practices often work in hospice settings and long-term care facilities.
Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) is said to be one of the first acknowledged holistic nurses. She was known as “The Lady of the Lamp” because she brought comforting light and a gentle smile to war-wounded soldiers. As a nurse, she was efficient and thorough, but she also treated each patient as an individual whose personal needs mattered -- the definition of a holistic nurse.
Holistic nursing should not be considered an alternative to modern medicine, but rather an adjunct for improved health care. The holistic nurse is a degreed professional registered nurse (RN) or licensed practical nurse (LPN), with an additional education in holistic nursing, usually a certificate or a degree. In addition to assessing the patient’s physical condition, holistic nurses will review the patient’s history and immediate environment. They may inquire about stress levels, family relationships, work history, upbringing, religious affiliation, and any other aspect that might affect the patient’s life.
When used as a complement to traditional medicine, holistic nursing can include several alternative healthcare treatments, depending on the specific malady. The patient is carefully evaluated and the nurse recommends a particular combination of treatments. Holistic healthcare practices include aromatherapy, shiatsu massage, yoga, neuro-linguistic programming (NLP), meditation, hypnotherapy, energy healing, and many other modalities.
Nutrition and body cleansing play an important part in holistic nursing. Macrobiotic diets and food combining may be prescribed, sometimes in combination with hydrotherapy (water therapy). The patient may be encouraged to partake in a nutritious diet to help flush harmful toxins from the body and increase energy levels. Additionally, holistic nurses will sometimes practice colonic hydrotherapy, also known as high colonics, where toxins are flushed from the bowels with injections of water.
Many hospitals and clinics employ holistic nurses. They provide patients with human caring and a respect for their personal dignity that is sometimes lacking elsewhere in the healthcare industry. Holistic nursing can be especially effective with terminally ill and long-term patients. The nurses form a personal bond that also extends to the patient’s family and friends to help ease the stress caused by illness. Holistic nursing offers a welcome alternative view of healthcare along with excellent, traditional nursing care.
source: wisegeek.com
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